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Mental Health & Toronto’s Asian Community

Description: Hear a panel of experts and people who have lived with these experiences as they discuss different perspectives on areas of mental health awareness within the community.

When: August 23, 2017 1:30pm - August 23, 2017 2:45pm

Where: 239 College Street, Toronto, ON M5T 1R5

Venue: Lillian H. Smith Library auditorium

Cost: Free

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2017-08-23 1:30pm 2017-08-23 2:45pm America/Toronto Mental Health & Toronto’s Asian Community Hear a panel of experts and people who have lived with these experiences as they discuss different perspectives on areas of mental health awareness within the community. 239 College Street, Toronto, ON M5T 1R5 Healthy Minds Canada [email protected]

 

Multiculturalism is an integral component in Canadian society. However, cultural diversity brings with it challenges in meeting the health care needs of different ethno-cultural groups. Chinese patients tend to deal with psychiatric illness initially through family supports and alternative naturopathic modalities. Patients of Chinese origin are one of the three highest populated ethnic patient groups treated at University Health Network (Toronto General Hospital, Toronto Western Hospital and Princess Margaret Hospital), including in the area of mental health.

Healthy Minds Canada hosted a panel of experts and people who have lived with these experiences discussing different perspectives on areas of mental health awareness within Toronto’s Asian community.


Moderator: William Ju
, Associate Professor, Human Biology, Teaching Stream, UofT

Panelists:

Kenneth Fung, MD FRCPC MSc:Clinical Director, Asian Initiative in Mental Health at Toronto Western Hospital & Associate Professor, Equity, Gender, and Populations Division, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto

Emillie Nguyen: Mental Health Worker with Hong Fook Mental Health Association, Prevention and Promotion Program.

Larissa Ho Author of the self-published Becoming Silver Girl, a series of short stories about her struggle with mental illness

 

Facts & Stats:

  1. Research shows that Asian men, particularly fathers, are ashamed to admit to emotional crises and often see mental illness as a religious challenge.
  2. According to a report on east Asian youth (ages 16-24) regarding mental health needs assessment, those from Cantonese, Mandarin, Korean, and Vietnamese backgrounds have adversely impacted their mental health due to substance use, negative immigration experiences, and increased shame.
  3. According to data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Chinese Canadians are less likely to access mental health services than Caucasian Canadians.
  4. While immigration has often been linked to stress and mental health challenges, studies show that Asian Canadian immigrants may be more reluctant to seek help due to shame and stigma related to cultural differences vis-à-vis the recognition and understanding of mental illness and mental health care.
  5. A cross-sectional study of psychiatric inpatients aged from 19 to 105 years showed that Chinese patients had greater odds of involuntary admissions of mental illness at hospitals in Ontario in 2016 compared to the general population.
  6.  Mentally ill Chinese and South Asian patients in Ontario experience much more severe symptoms by the time they get to hospital than patients from other groups. They were also more likely to be admitted and detained against their wishes. Researchers hypothesize that cultural factors are the main reason.

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